French version below.

 

A seulement 23 ans, Borrowed Identity impressionne par la variété de ses références musicales. Alliant la house à la funk, le hip-hop à la techno, il arrive à mêler des styles si différents que ses prestations ressemblent à une définition de l’éclectisme électronique. Il y a quelques semaines, il a régalé le Djoon d’un set de 3h aux allures de démonstration de groove, menant la belle boite du 13ème jusqu’à l’aube. Cette diversité s’exprime dans ses productions, sur des labels qui n’ont que peu en commun : entre un Ostgut Ton, fer de lance du Berghain aux lourdes sonorités techno des Steffi, Ben Klock et autres Marcel Dettmann, et le Quintessentials très british des VakulaBaaz et Anton Zap, il y a un tout monde.

Dans ce monde, DVS1 a créé Mistress Recordingsune jeune écurie née en 2013 avec comme credo l’éclectisme musical et une ode à la house grasse et agréable. Le 30 janvier prochain, le Rex permet au label de se réunir pour la première « Mistress Night » avec aux manettes le fondateur, le Devious 1, le jeune Borrowed Identity et le producteur français Fulbert, patron de Rawthenticity. En guise de prélude, on est heureux d’avoir pu échanger avec Chris autour d’un même idéal, le régal de nos sens auditifs.

 

 

– Hi Chris ! Thanks for awarding us some time ! First, you define your music as « ever adaptable, like the skin of a chameleon, which changes colour and intensity as and when it needs to best blend in with its setting. ». You must be travelling with quite a big records bag then aha ?

Yes man! For me its very important to be flexible in genres, styles and tempos as a dj. I am not the kind of nerd dj you see everywhere nowadays, who will play exactly the same kind of sound every night for his whole set. Sometimes people are shocked or surprised because I show up and play music no one expected, but that’s what’s exciting for me ! Most of the time in the end it works best when people are surprised, because in my opinion the expectations of djs and dancers are the thing that make club nights so boring. People come and expect deep house or techno, and there are just a few people that are really able to fill these high nerdy expectations. For me, things are the most exciting when they are unexpected, surprising and shocking at the right moment!! And you are right, I am used to travel with the biggest record bag UDG is offering – but since I am flying so much and the turntables don’t work properly 50% of the time, I also have USB sticks with me and the normal udg record bag.

 

– You talk about surprise and variety, have you listened to the last set of Floating Points and Four Tet at Plastic for its closure? It is full of changing moods! Awesome one, I wish I was there.. There are some gigs like this one that will surely stay in minds of people, do you have one that has your preference? One you would like to click on replay if you could? 

Floating Points is one of my favourite djs, so yes of course I know the set, it is a perfect example for what i mean! One of the sets I would love to replay is Soundstream‘s set from two years ago at Hinterhof in Basel. He entered the dj booth so smooth and took half an hour time to build the energy slowly but then it exploded : he played funk, futuristic breakbeats, vocal house, techno, even some experimental but cool dubstep, hiphop and more… and everything made so much sense together. I already djes eclectic before but this set definitely changed my dj DNA. Besides this I can recommend everyone to listen to dj Harvey and Theo Parrish sets from the 90s and Sadar Bahar!!

 

– Ah i didn’t know Sadar Bahar, I will listen for sure, thanks! Speaking about DNA, you are growing more and more on the music scene as a prominent house producer. How do you deal with it? More and more gigs of course, but also people who know you well now? You will come for the second time in Paris in two months (for our greatest pleasure), and in a few days in Strasbourg..

It is a pleasure to travel to all these different places : last year I have been djing in over 20 countries. I appreciate the fact that I am able to see the world and party with all these good people!!

But others need to decide if I am prominent or whatever I don’t care, I am doing what I am doing because music is my life and not for the fame. If I would do it for becoming prominent, then I would probably produce some Ibiza minimal techhouse or edm…

I am really happy that I am playing so much in Paris because I love the record shops, clubs and the party crowd a lot, besides Berlin it is my favorite place to play and also after Berlin the place I play the most gigs per year!!

 

– Tell us about your adventure with Berlin’s Berghain. You are released on Ostgut Ton, you play quite often in the club. How did it start?

Not a lot to tell nothing very romantic, the Berghain booker liked my record on Mistress and booked me, it seems like they liked my set because they started to book me regularly after this. For my track on Ostgut i have to thank Ryan Elliott who asked me and made it possible. At the moment I am playing every 3rd or 4th month at Panorama Bar ; I hope it stays like that because I really love to play for their crowd!!

 

– Yes of course, Berghain crowd is said to be awesome. A nice crowd + being behind the dj booth, it must be quite an experience. What about the ones of Asia? I have read you had been playing in Thailand and Vietnam, how is it over there? The culture of partying and enjoying the music must be different isn’t it? I was in Kuala Lumpur last year, I had been listening to really nice music, but was quite surprised to see the same people going to David Guetta « shows »..

I was playing in 8 different cities and 6 different countries in Asia ; every show was very different from each other. From the millionairs club to the dark techno club, I saw everything and the vibe was great everywhere I have been. The people there are very open for all kinds of sounds. It felt like the crowds have been pushing me to be even more eclectic than I am usually. I really enjoyed djing there without all the nerds and deck sharks we have here in Europe!!

I also played in Kuala Lumpur and saw what you mean, they don’t really have underground culture over there. The scene is just building and growing at the moment but from what I heard, club owners and promoters say there is a lot moving and changing at the moment the young Asian party crowd is getting more and more into techno and house. I will probably be back in summer for another tour in Asia, can’t wait to be back its really exciting and inspiring to see with how much passion people set up the nights!!

 

– What do you mean by nerds and deck sharks? For KL, a lot would say it’s due to the « mainstreamisation » of house and techno music, that it is not underground anymore.. Don’t you think it is a good way to make these music grow and attract a new public, a new way to re-dynamise the music world?

I am a nerd myself but if I go to a party, I let this behavior at home, too much people forget to party when they go to a party!! I mean all these people standing around dj booths looking depressed or mad because your not playing only the craziest Theo Parrish B sides out there or rare records for hundreds of euro…

Actually I don’t care so much if something is underground or mainstream, the only thing that matters to me is if I feel something when I hear a track. But I would say « mainstreamisation » is the wrong way to attract people even though a lot of people start getting into electronic music because of the commercial stuff and end in the underground years after. Mainstream or underground should not be a factor for any producer or dj because it blocks the creativity: if you think too much if you can do this and that and still be cool… Everyone should just do 100% what they feel and stop thinking so much. That is how I do it and see it!!

 

 

– What is the story behind your French named tracks ? You are playing quite much in France, plus you said in previous interviews you were a huge fan of French rap. A love affair with the camembert’s country?

Ahaha I love the camembert country!! The reason I have French titles is because, for me, French is the sexiest sounding language on earth!! My hometown in Germany is 20 minutes away from the French boarder, so I grew up with French music. The whole French 90s rap but also the first electronic music I ever fell in love was house music from France. The first house experience I can remember is watching TV as a six year old boy and jumping on my bed to the sound of Stardust and Daft Punk!

 

– Yes, Stardust and Daft Punk of course, I think we all danced on early DP « Da Funk ». Must be nice to discover such music while jumping on your bed, I can imagine aha! Do you still follow the rap scene? If yes, what could be your favorite of the moment? And maybe put rap in sets when feeling crowds would allow?

To be honest the only rap I hear today is the classic 80s & 90s rap, and I have been a huge rap nerd for most of my life… I am really bored of the clean digital bubblegum radio sound most rappers do since some years…

The key moment was when i turned 18 years old and finally was allowed to enter all clubs I wanted. I was really bored of the hiphop attitude in clubs and the aggressive vibe, most of the nights in these venues ended up in me having fights with other people… At one point, me and my best friend could not enter the hiphop clubs anymore because the bouncer knew we will have fights in there.

So we had to go to a techno club… At this time I thought this music was only for stupid people and drug addicts. I liked Daft Punk, Alan Braxe and this kind of stuff, but besides this I had no idea. We entered the dancefloor and immediately felt the energy from the base and the peaceful sexy vibe in the air. I never thought anything like this could happen to me, but after this night I could’nt listen to rap anymore… This one techno night changed my musical DNA, I became immediately addicted to techno.

So no there is no modern hip-hop in my sets, but from time to time I drop some Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul, Common,The Roots and other classic stuff.

 

– Aha I love the sentence « peaceful sexy vibe in the air », it is well describing the mood of a nice dance floor!! Maybe pushing people into clubs would allow them to overpass their clichés about house and techno music then ?!

Probably yes, but the problem is in most good clubs people don’t want to have so much « outside of the scene » people. In a lot of places I feel people stop going to a club if there are too much “hiphopers” or mainstream people coming. It would be the best if everyone would be more open but I also understand it, if I would bring all my old friends from the rap scene together in a club then there would be a lot of fights and shit going on and the ravers would leave the place sooner or later…

 

– Regarding to De La Soul and other hip hop guys, could I ask you therefore to put one Tribe Called Quest vinyl in your bag for the 30st of january? That would be so nice!! It is always great to be at a nice party, to have some good music, dancing well and feeling a good vibe entering the crowd, and hearing at once the first notes of a great classic, of a track you would not have thought you would hear it here..

Lets see what happens, I always have some of these tracks with me but I cant plan it, I need to surprise also myself when I dj otherwise its boring. So everything is possible but nothing specific should be expected.

 

– We have a ritual here at High Five with asking the same final and quite Frenchy question to all our interviewed artists. Dancing all night long, throwing a good party, playing records : that kind of night could let you eat an horse. What’s your favorite meal when coming back from a gig? or the day after?
Ahaha nice question! Even though I would like to say something fancy and extraordinary to be cool, I have to admit a lot of times I have a hangover from the weekend and then I eat pretty basic things : most of the time pasta, pizza, burgers. But at the moment im very much into sushi!!

 

– The answer has the merit to be honest! Thanks a lot Chris for these words, we are all looking forward to seeing you in Paris. That will be a great night, for sure !!
 

 

 

Version française.

 

 

– Salut Chris ! Merci de nous accorder du temps pour répondre à nos questions ! Commençons par toi : tu définies ta musique comme “toujours flexible comme la peau d’un caméléon qui changerait de couleur et d’intensité quand il a besoin de mieux se fondre dans son environnement”. Tu dois voyager avec un gros flight case du coup non aha?

Yes man! Pour moi, c’est extrêmement important d’être flexible dans les genres, dans les styles et dans les tempos. Je ne suis pas le type rependu de “dj geek” que tu peux voir un peu partout aujourd’hui, qui jouera exactement la même musique toute le long de son set. Parfois, les gens sont choqués ou surpris de la musique que je joue, inattendue, mais c’est ça le plus excitant pour moi ! Et la plupart du temps c’est dans ces cas là que ca marche le mieux, quand les gens sont surprise ; à mon sens c’est ce type d’attentes, de la part du dj ou du public, qui rend tellement de clubs ennuyeux aujourd’hui. Les gens viennent et attendent de la deep-house ou de la techno, et finalement il n’y a que très peu de geek qui arrivent à ressortir de là comblés de leurs attentes. Pour moi, le plus excitant c’est quand c’est inattendu, surprenant, et choquant en même temps !! Et pour ce qui est des flight cases tu as raison, je suis habitué maintenant à voyager avec le plus gros sac UDG existant – mais après, comme je voyage beaucoup et que pas mal de sacs se perdent en route, j’ai aussi quelques clés USB et un sac de taille normale, que je prends en cabine au cas où.

 

– Tu parles de surprise et de variété, est-ce que tu as écouté le dernier set de Floating Points et Four Tet au Plastic People pour sa fermeture? Il est extraordinaire de variété musicale, j’aurais aimé être là … Il y a des dates comme celle-ci qui resteront pour sûr gravées dans les mémoires ; en as tu une qui a ta préférence ? Pour laquelle tu aimerais avoir un bouton replay ?

Floating Points est un de mes Djs préféré, évidemment je connais ce set, c’est un exemple parfait de ce que je voulais dire ! Un des sets que j’aimerais réécouter est celui de Soundstream au Hinterhog de Bâle il y a deux ans. Il commence de manière tellement douce, prend plus d’une demi-heure pour construire un énergie lente … Puis d’un coup ça explose : il jouait du funk, des beats futuristes, de la house avec des vocals, de la techno, du hip-hop et même du dubstep expérimental, mais cool … Tout ça pris tellement de sens une fois réuni. Je mixais déjà des choses éclectiques avant mais ce set a définitivement changé mon ADN musical. A part ça, je recommande d’écouter les sets de Dj Harvey et Theo Parrish des années 1990, et Sadar Bahar !

 

– Ah je ne connaissais pas Sadar Bahar, je l’écouterai sans faute, merci ! En parlant d’ADN, ton rôle de producteur devient de plus en plus important dans la scène house. Comment le ressens-tu ? Plus de dates évidemment, mais aussi plus de gens qui te connaissent ? Tu viendras pour la seconde fois (et pour notre plus grand plaisir) à Paris ce mois-ci, et dans quelques jours à Strasbourg …

C’est un plaisir de voyager dans tous ces endroits différents : l’année dernière j’étais booké dans plus de vingt pays différents ! J’aime le fait de pouvoir observer le monde et faire la fête avec tous ces gens adorables. Mais c’est aux autres de décider si je suis important ou pas, cela m’est égal, je fais ce que je fais parce que la musique est ma vie et non pas pour un quelconque succès. Si je le faisais pour devenir populaire, je produirais probablement de la tech-house minimale façon Ibiza ou de l’EDM…

Et je suis très heureux quand je joue à Paris car j’adore vos disquaires, vos clubs et les gens qui font la fête ! A part Berlin, c’est ma ville préférée pour jouer, et aussi finalement, après Berlin, celle où je fais le plus de dates par an !

 

Dis nous en un peu plus sur ton aventure avec le Berghain. Tu sors des morceaux sur Ostgut Ton, tu joues souvent dans le club … Comment ça a commencé ?

Ce n’est pas très romantique à vrai dire, les bookers du Berghain ont aimé le morceau que j’avais sorti sur Mistress Recordings (le label de DVS1), et il semble qu’ils m’aient apprécié sur cette première date car ils ont continué de me booker après ça ahah. Je peux remercier Ryan Elliott pour mon morceau sorti sur Ostgut, c’est lui qui me l’a proposé et a rendu cela possible ! En ce moment, je joue tous les 3/4 mois au Panorama Bar, j’espère que cela restera comme ça car j’adore jouer pour ce public !

 

Bien sur, le public du Berghain est réputé pour être grandiose. Etre derrière les platines face à un tel public, cela doit être une grande expérience. Qu’en est-il du public en Asie ? J’ai lu que tu as joué en Thaïlande, au Vietnam, comment c’est là bas ? La culture de la fête et le plaisir de la musique doivent être différents ! J’étais à Kuala Lumpur l’année dernière, j’ai pu écouter de la très bonne musique mais j’étais surpris de voir que les gens qui en écoutaient étaient les mêmes que ceux qui allaient voir David Guetta …

J’ai joué dans huit villes et six pays différents en Asie et chaque événement était différent des autres. Depuis les soirées de millionnaires jusqu’au petit club de techno, j’ai tout vu, et l’ambiance était géniale partout où je suis allé ! Les gens sont très ouverts à différentes sortes de musiques, j’ai parfois senti que le public me poussait à être encore plus éclectique que d’habitude ! J’ai vraiment apprécié jouer ici sans tous les geeks et les « requins du premier rang » que nous avons ici, en Europe !

J’ai aussi joué à Kuala Lumpur and je vois ce que tu veux dire, ils ne savent pas vraiment ce qu’est une culture underground ici. La scène est encore en train de se construire et d’évoluer mais elle évolue très rapidement vers toujours plus de house et de techno selon les propriétaires de club ou les promoteurs que j’ai pu rencontrer ! Je serai probablement de retour en Asie l’été prochain et j’ai hâte ! C’est vraiment stimulant et inspirant de voir des gens passionnés construire la nuit !

 

– Qu’est ce que tu veux dire par geeks et requins du premier rang ? Pour KL, beaucoup diraient que c’est la « mainstreamisation » de la musique électronique, que ce n’est plus underground. Ne penses tu pas que dans un sens, c’est une bonne chose pour la house et techno, ca permet d’attirer un nouveau public. Peut-être une solution pour re-dynamiser la sphère musicale ?

Je suis moi même un geek à vrai dire, mais si je vais à une soirée, je laisse cette facette à la maison : trop de monde oublient de faire la fête quand ils vont à une soirée !! Par requins, je veux dire tous les gens qui restent devant le dj, qui ont l’air déprimés et qui deviennent fous quand vous ne jouez pas seulement la face B du dernier Theo Parrish …

En fait je m’en fous un peu si la musique est underground, si elle est mainstream. Les seules choses qui comptent, finalement, c’est si je sens quelque chose quand j’écoute une track.

Après, je dirais que la « mainstreamisation » est la mauvaise voie pour attirer les gens, même si beaucoup de gens commencent par écouter de la musique commerciale et finissent par écouter de la musique « underground ». Le mainstream ou l’underground ne devraient pas être un facteur pour n’importe quel dj ou producteur, ca bloque la créativité : comment veux tu faire de la bonne musique quand tu dois tout le penser si ca va être cool … Tout le monde devrait juste faire ce qu’ils ressentent et pas ce qu’ils pensent. En tout cas, c’est comme ça que je le vois et que je fais de la musique !!

 

 

 – Est ce qu’il y a une petite histoire derrière tes tracks aux noms français ? Tu joues beaucoup en France, tu aimes le rap français.. Une belle histoire avec le pays du camembert ?

Aha j’adore le pays du camembert !! La seule raison pour laquelle je nomme mes tracks en français est sans doute parce que le Français est le langage le plus sexy sur Terre !! Après, ma ville de naissance en Allemagne est à 20mn de la frontière, donc j’ai grandi avec le rap français. Le rap français, mais aussi ma toute première expérience de House music viennent de France. Ma première fois, c’était quand j’avais six ans et demi, je regardais Stardust et Daft Punk à la tv en sautant sur mon lit !

 

– Évidemment, Stardust et Daft Punk, je pense qu’on a tous dansé là dessus et sur le « Da Funk » des DP. Ca doit être super de découvrir la musique en sautant sur son lit aha ! Tu continues à suivre la scène de rap ? Si oui, tu as un favori du moment ? Et peut-être que tu insères un peu de rap dans tes sets ?

Pour être honnête, le seul rap que j’écoute c’est les classiques des années 80 et 90, et pourtant je suis un immense fan de rap … Je suis vraiment fatigué des résonnances aseptisées et chewing-gum des rappers d’aujourd’hui …

Le moment clé, ca a été quand j’ai eu 18 ans et que j’ai enfin eu le droit d’entrer en boîte, dans toutes les boites que je voulais. J’ai été saoulé de l’attitude hip-hop et des gens agressifs de la plupart des boites de rap, quasiment toutes mes soirées finissaient avec les poings, à me battre avec des gens … Du coup, un jour, mon meilleur ami et moi avons arrêté d’aller dans ces boites hip-hop.

On a « dû » aller dans une boite plus techno … A ce moment, je pensais que cette musique n’était que pour les idiots et les drogués ; j’aimais bien Daft Punk, Alan Braxe et ce genre de trucs, mais ca s’arrêtait là, le reste je n’en avais aucune idée. On est donc entrés dans cette boite, et directement, j’ai senti en arrivant sur le dancefloor cette énergie qui en émane, les « peaceful sexy vibes ». Je n’aurais jamais pensé qu’une chose comme ça aurait pu m’arriver, depuis je ne peux plus écouter de rap. Cette nuit a totalement changé mon ADN musicale, je suis devenu un « techno addict ».

Donc non, pas trop de hip-hop dans mes sets. Parfois je balance du Tribe Called Quest, De la Soul, du Coomon, du Roots, mais ca s’arrête là.

 

– Aha j’adore les « peaceful sexy vibes », c’est bien décrire l’ambiance sur un bon dancefloor ! Peut-être que forcer les gens à aller dans des boites techno pourrait être une solution pour les faire oublier leurs malheureux clichés sur la techno et la house du coup ?

Probablement, oui, mais l’autre problème est que dans les bonnes boites, les gens ne veulent pas avoir trop de gens qui ne sont pas dans leurs cercles. Dans beaucoup d’endroits je sens que les gens arrêteraient de venir s’il y avait trop de fans de hip-hop, ou trop d’adeptes d’un style plus mainstream. Tout est une question d’image malheureusement. Tout serait tellement mieux si les gens étaient plus ouverts. Mais après, dans un sens, je comprends ces gens, car si je devais amener tous mes anciens potes avec qui j’allais aux soirées rap, ca finirait aux mains tous les soirées, et tout le monde finirait par quitter la boite …

 

– Par rapport à De La Soul et aux autres gars du hip-hop, est ce que je pourrais pour finir te demander d’en mettre un ou deux dans ton sac pour la soirée du 31 ? Ca serait un super cadeau !!

Nous verrons comment ca va se passer, j’ai toujours certaines de ces tracks avec moi, mais je ne peux rien prévoir. J’ai aussi besoin de me surprendre, sinon ca devient chiant. Donc tout est possible, rien ne doit être attendu !

 

– Enfin, nous avons une petite question, bien française, que nous posons à tous nos interviewés. Quand tu danses toute la nuit, que tu passes toute la nuit derrière les platines, tu dois avoir une faim d’ogre ! Tu as un plat favori en rentrant de soirée ? Ou le lendemain peut-être ?

Ahah super question ! Je pourrais te dire pour paraître cool que je mange des trucs raffinés, extraordinaires, mais je dois t’avouer que la plupart du temps, j’ai juste trop faim et je mange des trucs très basiques : pates, pizza, burgers. Mais pour le moment, je suis à fond dans les sushis pour tout te dire !!

 

– Cette réponse a le mérite d’être honnête ! Merci beaucoup Chris pour ces gentils mots, on attend tous ici le 30 janvier et ton Rex. Ca sera une super nuit, c’est sûr !

 

 

Informations pratiques.

Borrowed Identity au Rex, c’est le 30 janvier avec DVS1 et Fulbert. Informations sur l’évent Facebook.

Vous pouvez suivre Borrowed Identity sur sa page Facebook, et High Five Magazine sur la nôtre.

 

Amaury